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A Survival Guide Guaranteed to Prevent Heat Stress

Posted on Friday, March 31st, 2017 by Mila Adamovica

The smart approach to work-related heat stress prevention includes setting up a wellness program for employees at risk. This can include those who work outdoors and in hot environments, like firefighters, farmers, miners, bakery and boiler room workers, construction and factory workers, who wear PPE according to their work requirements.

Wellness programs aim to educate teams on how to pro-actively ensure their health is not affected in any way by working in the extreme conditions. It includes training on using PPE correctly, and on being aware of resources that are available, and of the preventive measures that need to be taken before going to work in the heat.

What can you do to educate your team?

  1. Stress the importance of wearing PPE even in hot weather. Wear the required PPE with added heat stress prevention features, for example, use vented helmets instead of plain ones, get cooling towels, wraps, and vests, neck shades to cool down.
  2. Educate on the life-threatening symptoms to watch out for: hot, dry skin or profuse sweating, high body temperature, confusion, altered mental status, slurred speech, and seizures.
  3. Implement the following steps to assist your crew in staying safe in hot weather:
    • Take your time to acclimate: work short shifts to gradually get used to heat
    • Drink water before you get thirsty
    • Schedule frequent breaks to cool down
    • Install sunscreen dispensers in multiple locations, and encourage the team to use them
    • Provide sunscreen packs and lip balms with UVA/UVB protection qualities
    • Show how to treat an employee suffering from heat exhaustion before 911 arrives: cool down with cold compresses, give cool water, remove unnecessary clothing

Industries most affected by heat-related illnesses are construction, agriculture, building and grounds maintenance, landscaping, transportation, utilities, and oil and gas operations. Protect your workers from potentially fatal heat stress by training them on the dangers, symptoms and appropriate response measures.

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Staying Hydrated In the Warm Weather

Posted on Wednesday, May 25th, 2016 by Mila Adamovica

By Steve Rapoport, Director, Fresh2o

With the warm weather approaching, it is imperative to stay hydrated. The dog days of summer have hit with temps 100 degrees and higher! Not only is this unpleasant, it can be dangerous. Our body’s fluid requirement increases as the temperature rises and being dehydrated can have serious effects on your health. Check out my tips on how to keep yourself hydrated and learn which foods/beverages hydrate you.

Functions of fluid in the body

Our body is made up of 55 – 60% water. Water is essential for life and plays vital role in the body, including regulation of metabolism and body temperature. Every day we lose about 2 1/2 liters of water through breathing, perspiration, urine and bowel movements. And when you are outside in the heat, you lose even more. For our bodies to function properly, we need to replenish these fluid losses by consuming beverages and foods that contain water.

Who is at risk for dehydration?

Everyone who goes outside in the heat is at risk of dehydration, but those people who work or exercise outdoors, children, the elderly, and anyone who has the pre-existing conditions – such as respiratory or cardiovascular related conditions, or diabetes – has a greater risk.

Symptoms of dehydration

Symptoms of dehydration range from mild to life threatening. How many times have you had a headache, a dry mouth, felt weak or haven’t urinated in hours? It’s possible that you were dehydrated. Other symptoms include constipation, dry eyes, muscle cramps, decreased sweating, and nausea. While not a symptom, dehydration can increase risk of kidney stones. More serious symptoms include mental confusion, vomiting, racing pulse, difficulty breathing, seizures, etc. At this point, medical attention is needed immediately.

How much fluid do you need a day? The recommendation used to be that we consume 64 oz of water a day. However, newer research led to updated recommendations by the Institute of Medicine:

– adequate intake for men is ~ 3 liters (about 13 cups) of total beverages a day
– adequate intake for women is ~ 2.2 liters (about 9 cups) of total beverages a day.

It has also been shown that we can meet up to 25% of our fluid needs from watery foods, such as tomatoes, lettuce, watermelon and oranges.

*Keep in mind that your fluid needs will be higher if you work or exercise in the heat!

Stay Cool

Tips to increase your fluid intake in the hot weather

  • Eat watery fruits and veggies to get nutrition and fluid.
  • Don’t wait until you are thirsty. By the time thirst sets in, you are already dehydrated.
  • If you know you’ll be doing errands or in the car for extended periods of time, freeze bottles of water and take them with you. Drinking warm water when it is 90 degrees outside is not pleasurable! (nor is drinking hot Gatorade on a 60 mile bike ride!)
  • At work, set concrete goals with regards to fluid intake, otherwise you may get caught up in what you are doing and forget to drink. For example, tell yourself that you need to finish at least 3 16 oz bottles of water by the end of the day.
  • Drink 8 oz of water before you leave the house in the morning. Drink 8 oz with both lunch and dinner. Now you’ve consumed 24 ounces!
  • While water is always best, other beverages such as tea and coffee (both iced and regular), juice, sports drinks and milk count as fluid. In the past it was said that caffeinated beverages dehydrated you. We now know that they can provide your body with fluid – if you are used to drinking them.

My disclaimers:

*While I strongly discourage drinking soda, both regular or diet (for many reasons!), it does contain fluid and therefore will hydrate you. But try to get more of your fluid intake from water …
* But keep in mind that sports drinks and juices tend to contain large amounts of sugar – not a good thing for most of us …
* While caffeinated beverages can provide fluid, I don’t recommend consuming large amounts of caffeine (and some people shouldn’t consume any).

  1. If you don’t love plain water, try adding a squeeze of lemon or lime to flavor it. Or drink flavored seltzer.
  2. If you are exercising for 60 minutes+ (especially if it is in the heat), drink a sports drink that contains electrolytes and carbohydrates. Otherwise, plain water is fine. If you are working in the heat and sweating profusely, you may want to drink a low calorie sports drink such as G2 to get the electrolytes but with less sugar.
  3. A good way to test your hydration status is to check the color of your urine. Clear or light-colored urine means you’re well hydrated, whereas a dark yellow or amber color usually signals dehydration. Keep in mind that taking B vitamins can cause your urine to appear more yellow!
  4. It is highly unlikely that the average person will drink too much water. The exception may be with endurance athletes who drink large amounts of water when exercising for long periods of time. This can cause a potentially dangerous condition called hyponatremia (low sodium levels in the blood). This can be prevented by drinking a sports beverage that contains electrolytes (including sodium).
  5. Lastly – sorry but alcohol doesn’t count as fluid (to all my friends who get out the lemonade and vodka as soon as the temps rise … you know who you are!) Alcohol does the opposite and causes dehydration.

Be safe and drink up!

This guest post was originally published in HawsCo.com Blog by Samantha Hoch.

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What Is The Best Protection Against Welding Hazards?

Posted on Monday, May 23rd, 2016 by Mila Adamovica

The history of joining different metals together dates back to the Bronze Age. But it wasn’t until the end of the 19th century that the only welding process that existed was forge welding. Welding is a process that joins materials together by melting a metal piece with a filler metal to form a strong joint. Today, the most common types of welding processes are:

  • Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW), or Manual Metal Arc Welding (MMAW)
  • Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), or Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) Welding
  • Flux Cored Arc Welding (FCAW)
  • Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), or Metal Inert Gas (MIG) Welding
  • Plasma Arc Welding (PAW), Plasma Arc Cutting (PAC) and Gouging
  • Resistance Welding (RW) or spot welding
  • Air Carbon Arc Cutting and Gouging
  • Submerged Arc Welding (SAW)
  • Oxyfuel Welding, Cutting and Heating
Underwater welding

Underwater welding

Below is a table of safety hazards existing in different types of welding operations, and the recommendations on how to prevent injuries.

Welding Safety Hazards  and Protective Measures

Types of Hazards MPAW/PAC, Air Carbon Arc Processes SMAW, GTAW, GMAW, FCAW SAW OXYFUEL

Protective Measures

Ergonomic Y Y Y Y Use proper lifting techniques, foot rest, knee pads, and take breaks, or frequently change position to prevent musculoskeletal injuries, minimize vibration, remove debris and clutter to avoid slips and falls
Electric Shock Y Y Y N Inspect electrode holder for damage, do not touch electrically “hot” parts inside the welder case, keep welding cable and electrode holder insulation in perfect condition, use insulated tools, wear Arc Flash clothing, aprons, FR glovesheadwear and footwear.
Bright Light Y Y Y Y Make sure you are wearing protective glasses with side shields, or a welding helmet with a dark lens.
UV Radiation Y Y N N Wear UV protective clothing and headgear; the chart below indicates the correct lens shade numbers.
Toxic Fumes, Gases Y Y N Y Do not weld in confined spaces without ventilation,  stay upwind when welding outdoors; use respirators, portable exhaust systems: fans, fixed or removable exhaust hoods.
Fire, Burns, Heat Y Y N Y Inspect work area, remove any flammable materials, ensure access to fire hoses, sand buckets, fire extinguishers, wear a welding helmet, FR cotton, FR leather work clothes, do not roll up sleeves, wear pants over the top of leather work boots with 6-to-8-inch ankle coverage and metatarsal guards over the shoe laces.
Noise Y Y Y Y Define the appropriate hearing protection with the help of certified intrinsically safe sound meters. Use ear plugs or ear muffs in the environments with high levels of noise pollution.
Height (tower climbing) Y Y N Y When working at heights, prevent falls by using Arc Flash harnesses and lanyards.

Filter Lens Shade Numbers for Protection Against Radiant Energy

Welding Operation Shade Number
Shielded Metal-Arc Welding using 1/16, 13/32, 1/8 and 5/32 inch diameter electrodes 10
Gas-Shielded Arc Welding (nonferrous) using 1/16, 3/32, 1/8 and 5/32 inch diameter electrodes 11
Gas-Shielded Arc Welding (ferrous) using 1/16, 3/32, 1/8 and 5/32 inch diameter electrodes 12
Shielded Metal Arc Welding using 3/16, 7/32, and 1/4 inch diameter electrodes 12
5/16, and 3/8 inch diameter electrodes 14
Atomic Hydrogen Welding 10-14
Carbon-Arc Welding 14
Soldering 2
Torch Blazing 3 or 4
Light cutting, up to 1 in. 3 or 4
Medium cutting, 1-6 in. 4 or 5
Heavy cutting, over 6 in. 4 or 5
Light gas welding, up to 1/8 in. 4 or 5
Medium gas welding, 1/8-1/2 in. 5 or 6
Heavy gas welding, over 1/2 in. 6 or 8

The following OSHA standards are applicable to welding:

Welding, Cutting & Brazing 29 CFR 1910 Subpart Q,
Welding & Cutting 29 CFR 1926 Subpart J,
Welding, Cutting and Heating 29 CFR 1915 Subpart D,
Permit-Required Confined Spaces 29 CFR 1910.146,
Confined and Enclosed Spaces & Other Dangerous Atmospheres 29 CFR 1915 Subpart B,
Hazard Communication 29 CFR 1910.1200,
Respiratory Protection 29 CFR 1910.134,
Air Contaminants 29 CFR 1910.1000, 29 CFR 1915.1000, 29 CFR 1926.55.

Sources of information: CCOHS.ca, OSHA.gov

If you have questions or need help finding the right protection equipment, please feel free to call us at 800-829-9580, or visit us online at www.pksafety.com.

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Heat Stress Prevention: Keep Cool & Stay Safe

Posted on Wednesday, May 11th, 2016 by Analisa H.

Working in the heat, especially during Summer months, can lead to illness or even death. Common reactions are heat exhaustion, heat stroke, heat cramps and heat rash — all of which can be avoided following these heat stress prevention tips from OSHA.

Some risk factors that can cause heat stress include:

  • High temperature and humidity, direct sun exposure, no breeze or wind
  • Low liquid intake
  • Heavy physical labor
  • Waterproof clothing/non-breathable fabrics
  • No recent exposure to hot workplaces

You may be experiencing heat exhaustion or heat stroke if you have the following symptoms: headache, dizziness, fainting, weakness and wet skin, irritability or confusion, thirst, nausea, vomiting, passing out, collapse, seizures, or even if you have stopped sweating.

To prevent heat stress, make sure a heat stress prevention program is in place by your employer. Cool water should be available to workers close to the work area (at least one pint of water per hour is needed). Drinks with alcohol or caffeine should be avoided as these will dehydrate you. Work schedules should include rest periods and water breaks in shaded or air-conditioned areas. New employees may need to be acclimated to the heat by gradually increasing their workloads and allowing for more frequent breaks to stay hydrated. Protective clothing that’s lightweight, light-colored and loose-fitting should be worn. Consider those that provide cooling such as a vented hard hat or hats with neck shades, cooling wraps, cooling vests, and sunscreen.

If you or a fellow worker does experience heat illness, call a supervisor for help. If the supervisor is not available, call 911. Someone should stay with the worker until help arrives. If possible, move the worker to a cooler/shaded area and remove outer clothing. Fan and mist the worker with water, apply ice (ice bags or ice towels), and provide cool drinking water if the worker is able to drink. If the worker is not alert or seems confused, he or she may be experiencing heat stroke. Call 911 immediately and apply ice as soon as possible if this is the case.

If you have any questions in finding heat stress prevention products, please don’t hesitate to give us a call at 800-829-9580, or visit us online at www.pksafety.com, and follow us @PKSafetySupply.

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5 Things You Didn’t Know About Bug Repellent and Flame Resistance

Posted on Wednesday, June 10th, 2015 by Alastar Kerpel

Summer is right around the corner, are you adequately protected? Depending on your geographic locale, some insect borne illnesses that you may be at risk for are: Lyme disease, Heartland virus, West Nile disease, and more.There are many repellent ingredients and application types on the market. Depending on the work environment you need to use it in, there can be unique advantages and disadvantages for each of the products available. A few lesser known facts about these repellents include:

1. The well-known, longer lasting ingredients DEET and picaridin are not safe to use in  flammable or arc flash risk areas such as industrial work environments because they contain flammable contaminants. DEET and picaridin also reduce the thermal protection of FR clothing.

2. A higher concentration of DEET doesn’t mean stronger. A higher concentration of DEET equates to a longer period of protection.

3. Two common non-flammable natural insect bug repellents include geranoil and Vitamin B1. Geranoil is applied as a topical while B1 may be consumed in supplement form or via a patch. Stick with natural solutions if applying to face or neck.

4. Permethrin treated clothing, such as these coveralls, offers insect repellent while staying flame resistant. It may be applied during production of a garment or afterwards by the consumer.

5. If also applying sunscreen, the CDC suggests applying it first before bug repellent. Pay attention to when each product should be reapplied as they are likely to not be at the same intervals.

When you’re all finished working for the day wash your skin with soap and water, and wash treated clothing by itself before wearing again. If you develop symptoms of an insect related illness, see a doctor immediately.


PK Safety partners with you to meet OSHA regulations and stay safe all year round, see all of the repellents that we offer here. Work hard and stay safe!

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The Best Hard Hat for Warm Weather

Posted on Monday, May 20th, 2013 by Rick

Personal protective equipment (PPE) is seldom comfortable. Typically workers would rather not be bothered. That’s one reason OSHA mandates compliance for certain workers. At height workers require not only fall protection, but many need head protection as well. Traditional hard hats can feel like having an oven on your head. Especially while working in the heat and sun.

Luckily there is the Vertex Vent from Petzl. The Petzl Vent helmet, as the name suggests, features adjustable openings on either side to control the amount of air let in, and heat let out. By allowing heat to escape, this is an OSHA-compliant piece of PPE that hasn’t forgotten that it needs to be comfortable all day long. For workers carrying loads, or working under other workers where items could be dropped, a helmet with a sturdy chin strap is an important part of the safety program.




Comfort is key for workers who have demanding work at height. The Vertex Vent weighs only 12 oz. and the chin strap is extremely sturdy. Often what happens in the field is a fall will dislodge the hard hat from a worker who doesn’t have it strapped on. It might hang in there for the first bang, but often tumbles away, no use to anyone, for the second (third? fourth?) impact.

For workers who are serious about their equipment, the Petzl Vent is an excellent all-weather choice for head protection. If work requires night or early morning hours, the Petzl Vent comes standard with a spot to click in a Petzl Pixa Headlamp. That light, combined with an ultra-comfortable fit and chin strap will keep whatever you are facing illuminated without your needing to try to rig a light or attach an elastic band and headlamp to a rounded helmet.

Day or night, summer or winter, the Petzl Vertex Vent helmet literally has you covered. Because of the vents, this helmet is not rated for molten metal or chemical splash, but for just about everything else, it’s an ideal form of PPE for your noggin.

If you have questions about OSHA-required PPE, we are what is known as “experts.” Please feel free to contact us online at www.pksafety.com or give us a call at 800-829-9580 Monday through Friday, 7am – 5pm PST. As always, thanks for reading!

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Stock Up on Sunscreen for Workers as Temperatures Rise

Posted on Wednesday, April 10th, 2013 by Justin McCarter

Spring has sprung in about two-thirds of the contiguous United States at this point. And while North Dakota and Montana are both shoveling snow and dreaming about a 45-degree day, in the southern states it’s time to stock up and start using sunblock.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the best way to prevent skin cancer is to prevent sunburn. The best way to prevent sunburn is to stay indoors or possibly underground. Unfortunately, that’s not an option for the millions of construction workers, site maintenance workers, tower climbers, and others whose work requires them to be out in the elements in all types of weather. And while it’s important to use skin protection any time the sun is shining, it’s especially important during these early days of sun to avoid sunburns. The best way to do that is by using high-quality sunscreen and lip balm that protect against both UVA and UVB rays.

Outdoor workers should protect their skin against sunburn with sunscreen from SunX

Smart companies are setting up skin wellness programs for their employees who work outdoors. Whether that involves installing sunscreen dispenser units in convenient locations or filling their workers’ pockets or the cab of their trucks with sunscreen pouches, the most important thing is to find a way to encourage using the products provided.

Workers in a wide range of outdoor jobs have successfully avoided sunburns over the years with SunX products from Coretex. The SunX towelettes provide enough sunscreen to cover the arms, face, and legs of one worker. The low per-packet cost makes the towelettes affordable to employers while the portability makes them a favorite with workers because they can be kept in a back pocket or toolbox until they are needed.

If you are fortunate enough to be working outside in an area that already has abundant sunshine, be smart and protect your skin and your long-term health with quality sunscreen products from the skin wellness professionals at Coretex.

Regular readers of this blog may recognize the photo from a post on a similar topic about a year ago. Normally I wouldn’t use the same photo more than once, but this is my all-time-favorite. Thanks for reading.

-JM

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